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Fractured rocks

Fish Direction of the groundwater Direction of the groundwater Direction of the groundwater Direction of surface water run-off Direction of surface water run-off Direction of surface water run-off Direction of surface water run-off Direction of surface water run-off Direction of surface water run-off Direction of surface water run-off Infiltraion and percolation Surface expression GDEs Surface expression GDEs Direction of surface water run-off Low permeability rock Direction of surface water run-off Fault Fracture Fracture Fractures Direction of the groundwater Fish Low permeability rock Low permeability rock

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Fractured rocks (predominantly rocks with secondary porosity)

Fractured rocks store and transmit groundwater through fractures within otherwise low permeability rock.

Fractures, including joints and faults occur where stress exceeds the rock strength causing the rock to split along its weakest plane. Fracturing of rocks often results from tectonic movement of the Earth’s crust, which can be at a local or regional scale.

Fractured rock aquifers may discharge groundwater into channels largely in the lower parts of the landscape supporting fauna and flora communities, ecological processes and delivery of ecosystem services. Channels in upper parts of the landscape usually transmit surface water run-off only.

Pictorial conceptual model PDF


Last updated: 18 December 2015

This page should be cited as:

Fractured rocks, WetlandInfo 2015, Queensland Government, Queensland, viewed 30 October 2017, <https://wetlandinfo.ehp.qld.gov.au/wetlands/ecology/aquatic-ecosystems-natural/groundwater-dependent/fractured-rocks/>.

Queensland Government
WetlandInfo   —   Department of Environment and Heritage Protection