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Queensland wetland mapping FAQs

The Frequently Asked Questions provide information about the Queensland wetland mapping conducted by the Queensland Wetlands Program and address the relationship between this type of mapping and other wetland mapping in Queensland.

Fraser Island photo by Lana Heydon

Quick facts

Wetland habitat types
information and attributes are available as part of the data in the Queensland wetland mapping layers.

Search FAQ

For further information or assistance email questions to: wetlands♲ehp.qld.gov.au

Wetland on-line education modules

A series of on-line education modules, including Mapping wetlands in Queensland, has been prepared as a resource for people who want to learn more about wetlands.

Users can download and use the contents of this education module to meet their learning and training needs. This information should be used in conjunction with information found on this website.

This resource outlines the key principles of wetland mapping and should not be used for statutory purpose.

How are wetlands defined?

Due to the way legislation and policy has developed over time Queensland has a number of different wetland definitions. This in turn has led to the development and use of different mapping products.

The Queensland Wetlands Program wetland definition is based on the internationally accepted Ramsar definition

For more information on wetland definitions go to wetland definition page.

What is the difference between an image, a map and mapping data?

Though the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, an image, a map and mapping data are not the same thing.

In a geographical information context:

  • an image is a ‘picture’, generally taken from above, of an area at a given point in time. Examples of images include aerial photographs or SPOT and Landsat satellite images.
  • a map is a portrayal of an area that is drawn to a selected scale and generally shows one of a limited number of features (for example, wetlands or vegetation). Traditionally maps are produced by interpreting imagery and other information combined with limited ground truthing, and classifying the features into discrete classes. While images can be interesting and useful, it is necessary to interpret imagery to provide the systematic and consistent information contained in a map that is required for natural resource planning and management.
  • mapping data contains spatial information about the location and extent of mapped features, as well as descriptive attributes associated with those features (for example, wetland system or vegetation type). Mapping data is generally stored on a computer and manipulated using GIS software. GIS software can be used to view mapping data and query the information and attributes contained in the data. Mapping data can be used—either on its own or in combination with other data—to produce maps and statistics.

What kinds of wetland mapping exist for Queensland and how do they relate to each other?

Many different kinds of wetland mapping exist for Queensland. The following table provides information about some of the main wetland mapping products available at a state scale. Note that in addition to those listed there may be other wetland mapping products available for your local area.

Mapping data Scale Currency Line work Includes * Extent Limitations Use Contact

Queensland Wetland Data Version 4.0 - wetland areas

 

 

1:100,000 min 5ha/ 75m (Inland),

1:50,000 min 1ha/ 35m (Coastal)

See metadata

(2013, proposed updating every four years)

Wetland habitats mapped and classified

M, E, R, P and L wetlands, whether natural, modified or artificial.
See background and method

All of Qld (approximately 200,000 wetlands and 500,000 wetland habitats) Wetlands smaller than 1ha not mapped, does not include groundwater mapping, very little classification in subtidal area

Base mapping, may have multiple uses

DSITIA

Queensland Wetland Data Version 4.0 - wetland lines

 

1:50,000 to 1:100,000

See metadata (2013, proposed updating every four years) Wetland habitats mapped and classified

R wetlands, whether natural, modified or artificial

See background and method

All of Qld No attributes Base mapping, may have multiple uses DSITIA
Queensland Wetland Data Version 4.0 - wetland points
N/A See metadata

(2013., proposed updating every four years)

Wetland habitats mapped and classified M, E, R, P and L wetlands, for some regions only

See background and method

All of Qld, but not complete Not complete Base mapping, may have multiple uses DSITIA
Regional ecosystem mapping
To find data using link above use search term
“Biodiversity status” (including both quotes)
1:100,000 min 5ha/ 75m (Inland),
1:50,000 min 1ha/ 35 m (Coastal)
Most recent regional ecosystem mapping is version 7 showing 2009  extent Regional ecosystems mapped

Regional ecosystems that contain E, R, P and L wetlands

All of Qld Wetlands smaller than 1ha not mapped, does not include groundwater mapping, very little classification in subtidal area

Certified version under the Vegetation Management Act 1999 (Qld), input to Queensland wetland mapping

DSITIA
Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia
Variable
1:250,000
1:100,000
See metadata
Published 2005, updated infrequently
Broad aggregations rather than individual wetlands mapped, may contain non-wetland areas Nationally significant
M, E, R, P and L wetlands whether natural, modified or artificial
All of Qld (approximately 180 sites) Coverage for all of Queensland but does not represent all wetlands which would meet the criteria for nationally important wetlands Contextual information and incorporated into aquatic conservation assessments EHP
Ramsar
To find data using link above use search term "Ramsar sites" (including both quotes)
Variable See metadata
Mapping conducted from 1971-2002, updated as required
Ramsar sites rather than individual wetlands mapped, may contain non-wetland areas Internationally significant M, E, R, P and L wetlands 5 sites in Qld Limited coverage Triggers application of Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) EHP
DPI coastal wetlands
1:100,000 2003, no updates proposed Wetland habitats mapped Super tidal E wetlands only Entire Qld coastline Dataset dated and not maintained Natural resource management, input to Queensland wetland mapping DAFF

Map of referable wetlands consist of two data sets being:

1:100,000 min 5ha/ 75m (Inland),
1:50,000 min 1ha/ 35m (Coastal)
2010, updated 2011 Variable

Map of referable wetlands

includes wetland protection areas (WPAs) defined in the Environmental Protection Regulation 2008 

A trigger area surrounds a HES wetland and may apply up to 100 m within urban areas and up to 500 m outside urban areas.

Great Barrier Reef catchments
N/A EHP is a concurrence agency or assessment manager for development applications involving high impact earthworks and within WPAs on the map of referable wetlands EHP
High ecological/conservation value waters (HEV)
1:100,000
1:50,000
  Overlay on Queensland wetland mapping Largely unmodified wetlands only, mainly M, E, R and L wetlands Douglas, Mary, Great Sandy and South East Queensland 'Waters in which the biological integrity of the water is effectively unmodified or highly valued.' (EPPW, schedule 2)

Protected under the Environmental Protection (Water) Policy 1997 (given force under the Environmental Protection Act 1994 (Qld))


EHP
Aquatic Conservation Assessments using AquaBAMM
1:50,000 to 1:100,000 See metadata Variable Riverine, uses the Queensland wetland mapping lines as base dataset,
See background and method
Catchments of Great Barrier Reef, Queensland Murray-Darling Basin,

Wide Bay-Burnett,

Southern Gulf of Carpentaria and

Southeast Queensland

All river segments in an assessment unit are assigned the same value Used in many planning and prioritisation processes EHP
Aquatic Conservation Assessments using AquaBAMM
1:50,000 to 1:100,000 See metadata Variable Non-riverine, uses the Queensland wetland mapping areas as base dataset,

See background and method

Catchments of Great Barrier Reef,

Queensland Murray-Darling Basin,

Wide Bay-Burnett catchments,

Southern Gulf of Carpentaria and

Southeast Queensland

All river segments in an assessment unit are assigned the same value Used in many planning and prioritisation processes EHP
Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs)
Surface Expression Area Features Version 1.5

1:100,000 minimum See metadata Groundwater dependent ecosystems mapped and classified

Ecosystems dependent on the surface expression of groundwater,

See background and method

Eastern Murray–Darling Basin, Wide Bay–Burnett, Pumicestone Passage Catchment, Mackay–Whitsunday, South East Queensland, and Lake Eyre Basin and surrounding drainage sub-basins Incomplete attribution Base mapping only, may have multiple uses DSITIA
Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs)
Surface Expression Lines Features Version 1.5

1:100,000 minimum See metadata Groundwater dependent ecosystems mapped and classified

Ecosystems dependent on the surface expression of groundwater,

See background and method

Eastern Murray–Darling Basin, Wide Bay–Burnett, Pumicestone Passage Catchment, Mackay–Whitsunday, South East Queensland, and Lake Eyre Basin and surrounding drainage sub-basins Incomplete attribution Base mapping only, may have multiple uses DSITIA

Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs) Surface Expression Point Features Version 1.5

Variable, see metadata See metadata Groundwater dependent ecosystems mapped and classified Ecosystems dependent on the surface expression of groundwater,

See background and method

All of Qld Incomplete attribution Base mapping only, may have multiple uses DSITIA

Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs) Terrestrial Area Features Version 1.5

 

 1:100,000 See metadata Groundwater dependent ecosystems mapped and classified Ecosystems dependent on the subsurface presence of groundwater,

See background and method

Eastern Murray–Darling Basin, Wide Bay–Burnett, Pumicestone Passage Catchment, Mackay–Whitsunday, South East Queensland, and Lake Eyre Basin and surrounding drainage sub-basins Incomplete attribution Base mapping only, may have multiple uses DSITIA

Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs) Subterranean Area Features Version 1.4

1:250,000 minimum See metadata Groundwater dependent ecosystems mapped and classified Cave ecosystems dependent on the subterranean presence of groundwater,

See background and method

All of Qld Incomplete attribution Base mapping only, may have multiple uses DSITIA
Queensland land use Mapping 1:50,000 to 1:100,000 See metadata Contains wetlands See background and method Queensland N/A Land use DSITIA
Floodplain assessment overlay Various See metatdata Floodplain areas See background Queensland Does not cover all areas of Queensland Represents an estimate of areas potentially at threat of inundation by flooding See metadata
* wetland system abbreviations
M : Marine
E : Estuarine
R : Riverine
P : Palustrine
L : Lacustrine

Disclaimer: While every care is taken to ensure the accuracy of this product, the Queensland Government and Australian Government make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, reliability, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose and disclaim all responsibility and all liability (including without limitation, liability in negligence) for all expenses, losses, damages (including indirect or consequential damage) and costs which might be incurred as a consequence of reliance on the product, or as a result of the product being inaccurate or incomplete in any way and for any reason.

Relative importance/contribution of source datasets to mapping

The wetland mapping combines several information sources to make one map:

  • topographic streams
  • water bodies
  • wetland regional ecosystems
  • point datasets for example springs.

The relative contribution of 2 of the ‘source’ datasets (water bodies and regional ecosystems) to the mapping is presented in Table 1. Water body mapping is better at identifying open water bodies with no vegetation while the regional ecosystem mapping is better for identifying vegetated wetlands. Many wetlands were detected in both datasets however the overall extent of wetlands in Queensland required the use of both.

Table 1.  Proportional contribution by two source datasets to mapping by wetland system.
(Percentage of total area derived from each source)

Source

Water body mapping only Regional ecosystem mapping only

Overlap

Artificial 59 2 39
Mangroves & salt flats 5 44 51
Lacustrine 13 27 60
Palustrine 25 55 20
Riverine 11 76 13
All systems 21 57 22

What is the map of referable wetlands?

The map of referable wetlands identifies the location of wetland protection areas (WPA) in Great Barrier Reef catchments.

Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP) is a concurrence agency or assessment manager for development applications involving high impact earthworks and within WPAs on the map of referable wetlands.

To obtain a map of wetlands for a property go to the map of referable wetlands request form on the EHP website.

A map of Great Barrier Reef catchments can be downloaded that identifies the catchments where the SPP 4/11 applies.

Wetland naming protocol

Wetlands naming protocol

The Queensland Government encourages the community to suggest new names for geographic features in Queensland that have yet to be officially named.

The place naming process includes consideration of naming issues, provision of recommendations to the relevant Minister under the Place Names Act 1994, publication of notices and maintenance of the gazetteer or register of place names.

General Queensland wetland mapping FAQs

Why was the Queensland wetland mapping produced?

A sound understanding of different wetland types—and where these are located—is fundamental to managing and making decisions about wetlands. Producing comprehensive wetland maps for the whole of Queensland was therefore a key part of the Queensland Wetlands Program.

The Queensland wetland mapping is base mapping. It has no legislative standing in and of itself, however it may be used as an input for other wetland mapping products which may have legislative standing.

For more information please see the wetland mapping and classification fact sheet.

How was the Queensland wetland mapping produced?

The Queensland wetland mapping was produced using existing information including water body mapping derived from Landsat satellite imagery, regional ecosystem mapping, topographic data, and a springs database. The result is a consistent wetland map for the whole of Queensland.

Ancillary data, such as higher resolution imagery (for example SPOT and aerial photographs), other vegetation and wetland mapping, geology, soil and land system mapping was also used in attributing and assessing the derived Queensland Wetlands Program wetland mapping products.

The wetland mapping was done in accordance with a detailed peer reviewed methodology which included quality assurance measures for all steps in the process. For more detailed information on how the Queensland Wetlands Program wetland mapping was produced, please see the Wetland Mapping and Classification Methodology.

What information does the Queensland wetland mapping contain?

The Queensland wetland mapping contains a number of datasets. They are:

  • a wetland area data set that is made up of water bodies derived from satellite imagery and from wetland regional ecosystems. In addition to areas classified as wetlands this dataset also includes areas that are classified as floodplains and 51-80% wetland regional ecosystem mosaics (refer to Methodology for Survey and Mapping of Regional Ecosystems and Vegetation Communities in Queensland—Section 3.8.2 for further discussion of mosaic polygons).
  • a streams dataset containing lines that represent the drainage network for Queensland
  • a point dataset containing the location of inland springs, rock holes and other wetlands too small to map in the area and lines datasets.

For further information on how the following attributes are derived use the Queensland Wetland Mapping and Classification Methodology. The Queensland wetland mapping data (Queensland Wetland Data Version 3.0 - wetland areas) contains attributes which help classify wetlands as follows:

Marine

Attribute and attribute code Explanation Resolution
M Marine System
Salinity
T1 Tidally inundated (marine and estuarine systems) Local
Local hydrological modification
H1 Natural wetland (no modifications observed) Local

Estuarine

Attribute and attribute code Explanation Resolution
E Estuarine System
Salinity
T1 Tidally inundated (marine and estuarine systems) Local
Local hydrological modification
H1 Natural wetland (no modifications observed) Local
H2M7 Riverine or estuarine wetlands mostly converted to constructed waterways such as canals or irrigation channels, usually by earthworks to bed and/or banks Local
H3C2 Artificial channel (drain/canal) Local
Habitat
Mangroves and related tree communities Treed estuarine communities - derived from regional ecosystem Local
Salt flats and saltmarshes Grass, herb sedge communities - derived from regional ecosystem Local
Regional ecosystem
Vegetation communities Derived from regional ecosystem Local

Riverine

Attribute and attribute code Explanation Resolution
R Riverine System
Salinity
S1 Fresh (including subsaline) Local
S2 Hyposaline Local
S3 Mesosaline Local
Local hydrological modification
H1 Natural wetland (no modifications observed) Local
H2M1 Dams or weirs within riverine channels (note this changes riverine to lacustrine) Local
H2M7 Riverine or estuarine wetlands mostly converted to constructed waterways such as canals or irrigation channels, usually by earthworks to bed and/or banks Local
H2M8 Lakes or swamps or rivers, with no modifications observed but hydrology altered by irrigation activity Local
H3C2 Artificial channel (drain/canal) Local
Water regime
WR0 Water regime unknown Local
WR1 Rarely inundated Local
WR2 Intermediately inundated Local
WR3 Commonly inundated Local
Regional ecosystem
Vegetation communities Derived from regional ecosystem Local

Palustrine

Attribute and attribute code Explanation Resolution
P Palustrine System
Salinity
S1 Fresh (including sub-saline) Local
S2 Hyposaline Local
S3 Mesosaline Local
Local Hydrological Modification
H1 Natural wetland (no modifications observed) Local
H2M2 Lakes or swamps where size and/or hydrology altered, e.g. by construction of levee banks or deepening Local
H2M3 Lakes or swamps where salinity classification changed by banks or bunding from estuarine/marine to freshwater Local
H2M3p Ponded pastures (hydrology changed from estuarine to freshwater, dominated by exotic pasture species) Local
H2M4 Modified springs - damaged Local
H2M4a Modified springs - dormant Local
H2M5 Wetlands damaged by mechanical disturbance, e.g. cropping Local
H2M6 Wetlands completely converted to a ring tank or other controlled storage Local
H2M8 Lakes or swamps or rivers, with no modifications observed but hydrology altered by irrigation activity Local
H3C3 Highly modified floodplain waterbodies Local
Water regime
WR0 Water regime unknown Local
WR1 Rarely inundated Local
WR2 Intermediately inundated Local
WR3 Commonly inundated Local
Climate
Equatorial The Koppen system intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Tropical The Koppen system intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Subtropical The Koppen system intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Arid (desert) The Koppen system intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Semi-arid (grassland) The Koppen system intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Temperate The Koppen system intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Dominant water source
Floodplain

Water derived primarily from floodplain (water from rain that turns into run-off is overland flow until it gets to a water course. This becomes floodplain when it breaks its banks and flow across the land again).

Derived from regional ecosystem

Landscape
Non-floodplain depressionsal Water derived primarily from non-floodplain ources (rainwater, overland flow) Landscape
Non-floodplain groundwater Water derived from groundwater Landscape
Soils
Rock Derived from regional ecosystem Landscape
Soil Derived from regional ecosystem Landscape
Sand Derived from regional ecosystem Landscape
Habitat
Palustrine habitats Largely derived from regional ecosystem Local
Regional ecosystem
Vegetation commnunities Derived from regional ecosystem Local

Lacustrine

Attribute and attribute code Explanation Resolution
L Lacustrine System
Salinity
S1 Fresh (including subsaline) Local
S2 Hyposaline Local
S3 Mesosaline Local
Local hydrological modification
H1 Natural wetland (no modifications observed) Local
H2M1 Dams or weirs within riverine channels Local
H2M2 Lakes or swamps where size and/or hydrology altered, e.g. by construction of levee banks or deepening Local
H2M3 Lakes or swamps where salinity classification changed by banks or bunding from estuarine/marine to freshwater Local
H2M3p Ponded pastures (hydrology changed from estuarine to freshwater, dominated by exotic pasture species) Local
H2M5 Wetlands damaged by mechanical disturbance, e.g. cropping Local
H2M6 Wetlands completely converted to a ring tank or other controlled storage Local
H2M8 Lakes or swamps or rivers, with no modifications observed but hydrology altered by irrigation activity Local
H3C1 Artificial stand-alone water storage not in a natural water body or channel Local
H3C3 Highly modified floodplain waterbodies Local
Water regime
WR0 Water regime unknown Local
WR1 Rarely inundated Local
WR2 Intermediately inundated Local
WR3 Commonly inundated Local
Climate
Equatorial The Koppen system has been intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Tropical The Koppen system has been intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Subtropical The Koppen system has been intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Arid (desert) The Koppen system has been intersected by the IBRA sub regions Continental
Semi-arid (grassland) The Koppen system has been intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Temperate The Koppen system has been intersected by the IBRA subregions Continental
Dominant water source
Floodplain

Water derived primarily from floodplain (water from rain that turns into run-off is overland flow until it gets to a water course. This becomes floodplain when it breaks its banks and flow across the land again).

Derived from regional ecosystem

Landscape
Non-floodplain depressionsal

Water derived primarily from non-floodplain ources (rainwater, overland flow)

Derived from regional ecosystem

Landscape
Soils
Rock Derived from regional ecosystem Landscape
Soil Derived from regional ecosystem Landscape
Sand Derived from regional ecosystem Landscape
Habitat
Lacuastrine habitats Largely derived from regional ecosystem Local
Regional ecosystem
Vegetation communities Derived from regional ecosystem Local

For more information on how the Queensland wetland mapping is constructed and associated attributes are applied, please see the Wetlands Mapping and Classification Methodology.

Users can vary the information portrayed in a map produced from the Queensland Wetlands Program wetland mapping data to suit their needs. The 1:100,000 scale maps provided in PDF and KML (access mapping) format are coloured to show the distribution of the different wetland systems and the mapping source (water bodies or regional ecosystems).

The interactive map server WetlandMaps and the Queensland wetland mapping data shows wetland distribution and classification and contains information about all of the wetland attributes listed above, which can be queried and displayed to suit the user.

Does the Queensland wetland mapping contain information about wetland condition?

The Queensland wetland mapping contains local hydrological modification information for wetlands which describes modifications caused by construction or other works which may affect wetland condition.

Other wetland condition attributes are not described in the mapping. For example, though the Queensland wetland mapping may indicate that a wetland is a particular regional ecosystem which contains species specific to that ecosystem, there may in fact not be many of those species in the wetland due to clearing and/or other disturbances.

How can I get the Queensland wetland mapping?

Queensland wetland program mapping delivery

What is the currency, scale and accuracy of the Queensland wetland mapping data?

Currency, scale and accuracy

 

Where can I find the metadata for the Queensland wetland mapping data?

Metadata

Who do I contact for more information, assistance or to provide feedback using the Queensland wetland mapping?

Contact wetlands♲ehp.qld.gov.au

Specific Queensland wetland mapping FAQs

Are floodplains included in the Queensland wetland mapping?

Many areas of floodplains do not remain wet long enough to generate wetland soils or support wetland species and therefore are not wetlands according to the Queensland Wetlands Program wetland definition. Parts of a floodplain may meet the definition of a wetland and are sometimes called floodplain wetlands. Floodplains themselves, however, are not wetlands per se.

Due to the importance of floodplains in wetland management a floodplain layer, where available, has been included in the wetland mapping data for GIS users. Floodplains are included as a separate field in the HYD_WETLAND feature class (“FLOODPLAIN”) and can be added as a separate addition of this layer to an MXD file.

Flood mapping is now available from Queensland Reconstruction Authority.

Are artificial wetlands included in the Queensland wetland mapping?

Yes. Artificial and modified natural wetlands such as farm dams, ring tanks and canals are included in the Queensland wetland mapping. Not all wetlands are totally natural or totally artificial, some are natural wetlands that have been modified. One of the attributes included in the Queensland wetland mapping is a local hydrological modifier which identifies whether a wetland is natural, modified, or artificial.

For more information on these hydrological modifiers go to What information does the Queensland wetland mapping contain?

Is riparian vegetation included in the riverine wetlands that are mapped?

Riverine systems are often associated with fringing wetland vegetation which by definition is classified as a palustrine wetland system separate to the channel which is classified as a riverine wetland system.

However, in many instances the Queensland wetland mapping scale is not large enough to distinguish between the two wetland systems as the minimum width shown on the mapping is 35m on the coast and 75m for inland areas. Therefore areas mapped as a riverine wetland on the Queensland wetland mapping often include (unmapped areas of) fringing palustrine wetlands. For more information see the Wetland Mapping and Classification Methodology.

What does lacustrine and palustrine mean?

Wetland system definitions

How did you decide where a riverine wetland ends and an estuarine wetland begins?

The primary mechanism used to distinguish between systems influenced by tidal salinity (estuarine and marine) and those not influenced by tidal salinity (riverine, palustrine and lacustrine) is water sampling to determine where salinity drops below 5ppt. However, as the Queensland wetland mapping is compiled remotely using existing data, it is necessary to use mapping surrogates.

Where the cut-off between saline and fresh water is across a channel, the surrogates used to determine the mean high water springs (MHWS) were the presence of a barrier such as a barrage or weir, or the line between estuarine and non-estuarine vegetation. Where the cut-off is outside a channel, the surrogate used to determine the highest astronomical tide (HAT) was the boundary between estuarine and other types of vegetation or water. For more information go to Wetland Mapping and Classification Methodology.

How did you decide where an estuarine wetland ends and a marine wetland begins?

The primary mechanism used to determine the boundary between estuarine and marine wetlands is water sampling to determine where salinity drops below 34ppt. Wetland systems where salinity is lower than 34ppt are classified as estuarine, those with salinity higher than 34ppt are classified as marine.

However, given the inherent variability of this characteristic over various temporal and spatial scales and as the Queensland wetland mapping is compiled remotely using existing data, it is necessary to use mapping surrogates.

The current Queensland wetland mapping uses estuarine geomorphic features to approximate the extent of persistent estuarine conditions using a range of remotely sensed Landsat ETM imagery as base data. This approach is similar to that of the OzEstuaries program (for more information, go to the OzCoasts website).

The Queensland Wetlands Program is working toward utilising a range of more sophisticated techniques to better approximate the extent and variability of the boundary between estuarine and marine systems using remotely sensed methods in accordance with the Queensland Wetlands Program wetland definition.

How did you decide where the marine wetlands end?

According to the Queensland Wetlands Program wetland definition marine wetlands extend to a depth of 6m below the Lowest Astronomical Tide. However, a map of the 6m bathometric (ocean depth contour) does not currently exist for Queensland, therefore the 3 nautical mile limit has been used to draw the edge of the marine wetlands in Queensland waters on the Queensland wetland mapping. If the 6m bathometric data becomes available in the future the Queensland wetland mapping will be updated.

Specific Queensland wetland mapping geographic information system FAQs

What formats is the Queensland wetland mapping data available in?

The Queensland wetland mapping is created using a geodatabase and exported into shape file format. A number of layer files and an MXD file are also created for use with ESRI Arc View programs. Three predefined layer files have been prepared for viewing the Queensland wetland mapping.

I am not using an ESRI GIS program. How can I view the Queensland wetland mapping?

If you are not using an ESRI GIS program, you should access the inbuilt or online help file for your program to determine how to import and use ESRI files. Some programs, such as MapInfo, can use shape files directly. For others, such as AutoCAD, you may need to use a utility to import the file. There are also a number of free programs available on the internet (e.g. ArcExplorer which is available from ESRI) that will allow you to perform simple operations such as viewing, navigating and querying shape files.

How is the digital wetland mapping projected?

The geodatabase coordinates are geographic. More specifically, they are geodetic longitude and latitude (Datum: GDA94 Projection: GCS94). The data includes wetland area and habitat area fields which provide the wetland and habitat areas in hectares for analysis; however, if you would like to measure distances in metres you will need to project the data to an appropriate coordinate system.

How can I extend my use of the Queensland wetland mapping data?

The Queensland wetland mapping can be imported into other GIS analyses as needed by the user. Any GIS program that is capable of importing shape files is capable of using the Queensland wetland mapping data. It must be noted that the disclaimers on the data should be maintained on all products produced. Data should be used appropriately and at the recommended scale.

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Last updated: 18 November 2015

This page should be cited as:

Queensland wetland mapping FAQs, WetlandInfo 2013, Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, Queensland, viewed 13 April 2017, <https://wetlandinfo.ehp.qld.gov.au/wetlands/facts-maps/wetland-background/faq/>.

Queensland Government
WetlandInfo   —   Department of Environment and Heritage Protection