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Impact assessable

The State assesses and approves major infrastructure projects, including mining in accordance with environmental impact assessment processes. Matters of National Environmental Significance are included in the consideration of potential impacts.

Please note disclaimer at bottom of page.

Additional information

Halifax Bay Photo by EHP

Quick facts

Queensland
has the most diverse array of wetlands in Australia. Wetlands deliver many ecosystem services that contribute to our wellbeing—such as water and food supply, filtering of pollutants, regulation of climate and flooding, coastal protection, provision of habitat for biodiversity, and recreation and tourism opportunities.

State development assessment self-assessbale environmental approvals

Matters of national environmental significance
The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act) is the Australian Government’s central piece of environmental legislation. It provides a legal framework to protect and manage nationally and internationally important flora, fauna, ecological communities and heritage places—defined in the EPBC Act as matters of national environmental significance (MNES).

Mechanism and recognition of wetland and terrestrial biodiversity values

Ramsar sites, World Heritage Areas and other MNES are protected under the EPBC Act. In Queensland, five sites are listed under the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance. Among other things, the Act regulates actions that will or are likely to have a significant impact on the ecological character of MNES.

Resources

  • Information on Ramsar wetlands in Queensland and links to information published by the Australian Government.
  • Information on assessment and approvals under the EPBC Act.
Environmental Impact StatementResource activities
The aim of the Environmental Protection Act 1994 is to protect Queensland's environment while allowing for development that improves the total quality of life, now and in the future, in a way that maintains ecological processes on which life depends. This approach is termed 'ecologically sustainable development'.

Mechanism and recognition of wetland and terrestrial biodiversity values

Resource activities may be required to undergo an environmental impact statement (EIS) process preceding, and additional to, the draft environmental authority stage. Resource activities include mining, petroleum (including coal seam gas), geothermal and greenhouse gas storage activities. The Environmental Protection Regulation 2008 sets out environmental objectives and performance outcomes for a range of values including land, wetlands and waters. The EIS must identify and describe the environmental values to be protected and how the project will meet requirements under the Regulation.

Resources

  • Information on the EIS process including the following guidelines:
  • Triggers for environmental impact statements under the Environmental Protection Act 1994 for mining and petroleum activities
  • Generic terms of reference for an Environmental Impact Statement and related specific content guidelines including aquatic ecology
  • Wetland tools support the development and implementation of EIS including the Queensland Wetlands Mapping which is linked to classification, assessment and other information available on this website (WetlandInfo).
  • EIS information guidelines:
Environmental Impact StatementCoordinated projects
The State Development and Public Works Organisation Act 1971 (SDPWO Act) facilitates timely, coordinated and environmentally responsible infrastructure planning and development to support Queensland's economic and social progress.

Mechanism and recognition of wetland values

The Coordinator-General may declare a project to be a ‘coordinated project’ requiring an 'environmental impact statement’ (EIS) if the project has the potential to cause environmental, social or economic impacts. This type of project often requires multiple approvals and has significant infrastructure requirements. The SDPWO Act defines the environment as including ecosystems and their constituent parts and all natural and physical resources. Among other things, the EIS must identify and describe the environmental values to be protected and how the project meets environmental objectives and performance outcomes described in State legislation.

Resources

  • Information on the EIS process under the SDPWO Act.
  • Wetland tools support the development and implementation of EIS including the Queensland Wetlands Mapping which is linked to classification, assessment and other information available on this website (WetlandInfo).

Disclaimer: While every care is taken to ensure the accuracy of this information, the Queensland and Australian Governments make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, reliability, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose and disclaim all responsibility and all liability (including without limitation, liability in negligence) for all expenses, losses, damages (including indirect or consequential damage) and costs which might be incurred as a consequence of reliance on the product, or as a result of the product being inaccurate or incomplete in any way and for any reason.


Last updated: 12 March 2015

This page should be cited as:

Impact assessable, WetlandInfo 2014, Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, Queensland, viewed 1 February 2017, <https://wetlandinfo.ehp.qld.gov.au/wetlands/management/policy-legislation/plan-approval/impact-ass.html>.

Queensland Government
WetlandInfo   —   Department of Environment and Heritage Protection