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Wetland ecology

Wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world—comparable to rainforests. While covering only 6% of the Earth's surface (approximately 4.1% of Queensland), wetlands provide a disproportionately high number of ecosystem services that benefit, sustain and support the environmental, social and economic well-being of people.

There are many types of wetlands ranging from rivers, swamps and lakes to estuaries and even coral reefs that also support a whole variety of different wetland plants and animals.

Wetland ecology looks at the interactions between organisms and their environment[1].

Whistling ducks, Photo by David Scheltinga

Quick facts

>1 million
species in Australia
310
known animal species under threat in Australia
1180
known plant species under threat in Australia
At least 114
plants and animal species already extinct in Australia[2]

References

  1. ^ Ecology of the Environment, University of Utah, viewed 10/30 2012, <http://www.hum.utah.edu/~plutynsk/EcologyandEnvironment.pdf>.
  2. ^ Threatened species and ecological communities in Australia 6/3/11, Australian Government, viewed 2/20 2013, <http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/overview.html>.

Last updated: 22 March 2013

This page should be cited as:

Wetland ecology, WetlandInfo, Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, Queensland, viewed 17 June 2016, <http://wetlandinfo.ehp.qld.gov.au/wetlands/ecology/>.

Queensland Government
WetlandInfo   —   Department of Environment and Heritage Protection